The 13 Hottest Cars Ever Featured in Movies!

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Hottest Cars in Movies

Cars and film go together like Salma Hayek in a bikini, Megan Fox is alive and that girl from Fast and the Furious in a ’67 Mustang. It’s part of our culture. We want to see muscle cars ragged through the gears until the valves jump up through the bonnet and do a little dance, we want to see half-naked girls inside cars doing things that half-naked girls do inside cars and we want to see hard men with bald heads pretend to know how to drive like F1 drivers. Here are the hottest cars ever featured in the film.

Chevrolet Camaro

chevrolet-camaro


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Ahhh, good old Bumblebee – where would we be without him? The first Transformers film redefined how hot we all thought Megan Fox was. Seriously, in fear of sounding a little sexist, how hot did she look in that film? Right, back to Bumblebee – sorry about that. The specially designed Chevrolet Camaro – dubbed Bumblebee – became an iconic car within the film thanks to its starring role and vibrant paint job.

Not only did the car kick-ass – remember, it was a Transformer and Transformers kick ass – but it also won our hero the girl – who was Megan Fox. Damn you Bumblebee!


All the cars from The Fast and the Furious

Fast-and-Furious-Cars

It’s probably fitting to mention The Fast and the Furious franchise, as the latest edition, The Fast Five, is currently available for your viewing pleasure. The first film, however, was the pick of the bunch for cars. Seriously, watch the film, there isn’t a storyline. It’s just Paul Walker pouting a lot, Vin Diesel flexing a lot and the two combined driving lots of exotic cars – or in other words, a proper film!

Who needs heartfelt storylines that push the boundaries of emotional rapture? Just get in your V8 and drive, sonny! The pick of the bunch has to be Walker’s Mitsubishi Eclipse, which aside from being green, was also extremely fast and made the girls fancy Mr. Walker even more. Great.


TVR Tuscan

TVR-Tuscan

If you’re a motoring fan, the years of 1999, 2000 and 2001 were just automotive porn. We were treated to car movies that were so cool even the cool side of the pillow couldn’t compete. One of the best films from that era was Swordfish. Starring John Travolta, a young Hugh Jackman, and the extremely sexy Halle Berry, the film looked so achingly cool that you wanted to become a computer hacker even if it meant going to prison.

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They used the fabulous TVR Tuscan for the main car chase scene, which not only immortalized the Tuscan as one of the coolest British cars ever made but also actually gave Travolta some street cred – what a car.


Gone in 60 Seconds

Shelby-Mustang

Another film from the early 2000s, Gone in 60 Seconds is a cult classic that revolves around the premise of Memphis Raines (Nicholas Cage) needing to steal 50 cars in one night to save his brother from impending death. There’s car porn throughout the film, but the best one has to be 1969 Shelby Mustang GT500 – aka Eleanor.

Has any car looked that cool before? No, it’s not. The noise, the looks, and the performance just create an appeal that few other cars can replicate. And with Nick Cage actually doing a stellar job of the acting, it just results in a proper petrolheads’ film.


Bad Boys

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The original Bad Boys film featured Will Smith and Martin Lawrence as a likely double-act who acted brilliantly in combining humor and I’ll-kick-your-ass-if-you-look-at-me-wrong intimidation. The real star of the show, however, was the black Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 that Will drove.

If menace, power, and stealth could be encapsulating into a car, the 964 Turbo featured in Bad Boys would be the example. Its amazing engine note just added even more petrolhead porn to a film that was already famous for its great car scenes.


Starsky and Hutch

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A Ford Torino, at first glance, doesn’t seem like a very cool car – it looks more like something your Nan would drive to church. But don’t be fooled, because all you need to do is paint it candy red, give it a white stripe and only allow cool, 70’s cops to drive it, and then you’ve got an iconic American muscle car that gets respect wherever it goes.

If you’ve never seen the original Starsky and Hutch and you’re under 25, you may be more interested in the 2004 interpretation that starred Ben Stiller and Snoop Dogg, but for anyone over 25, stick to the original.


Ronin

Ronin Audi S8

What do you get when you combine a green Audi S8, Robert DeNiro, that guy who’s foreign but is always in really cool films and a great location? You get the epitome of cool, the daddy of acting and the film of the year. Ronin has become a cult hit for petrolheads across the globe.

It’s the Audi S8 that manages to take everyone’s attention, however, as it marked the start to the great run of properly cool Audis that came in the early 2000s.


The Dukes of Hazzard

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Driving an orange ’69 Dodge Charger named General Lee may hint to your fellow peers that you’ve been eating too much strong cheese at night, but despite the dodgy name and questionable paint job, the car still manages to stay iconic – even today.

A lot of us think of Jessica Simpson’s music video for ‘These Boots are Made for Walkin’ when someone mentions the Dukes of Hazzard – if you don’t know why to watch the video. But the film itself is still full of young, hormonal fun, and General Lee easily manages to steal the show.


Mad Max


mad-max-ford-falcon

Most Australian petrolheads know that Eric Bana is a Ford Falcon man, and so it seems is Mel Gibson. The 1979 Australian-made film, Mad Max, gave Gibson one of his earliest hits, but for us, it’s the Falcon that won our hearts.

The reason? Well, it’s quite simple really – JUST LOOK AT THE ENGINE! It’s popping out of the bonnet! So, by using our combined petrolhead IQ, we can conclude that this Falcon is one of the finest machines ever made.


Tomorrow Never Dies

bmw-750li-james-bond

Whether you think Pierce Brosnan was a good James Bond or not is irrelevant, because of one key aspect to all of his films – the cars. The period between 1995 and 2004 (when Brosnan was Bond) gave us some of the most ludicrous plots, sexy women and incredible car porn has ever seen in the franchise.

One of the best of the bunch was the BMW 750Li in Tomorrow Never Dies. The Li variant of the 7-series range featured some power than god, more luxury than any saloon in that price range and more gadgets than Q’s briefcase. Without this car, we may have all been directed towards Bronsnan’s questionably Bond performance. Thanks, BMW.


The World is not Enough

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Another Pierce Brosnan Bond film and another incredible BMW – did the German marque have a deal going on? Hmmm. Anyway, The World is not Enough gave us another impossible plot that was about as believable as the rise of Gandhi, but most importantly, it gave us the BMW Z8.

The Z8, in truth, flopped like a fat man on a diving board, but the car looked so cool in this film it made every petrolhead want one – just not enough to hand over the pennies.


Death Race

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You’ve got to applaud Jason Statham; he’s made a career out of being as British as a bulldog and by being good at jumping and seducing women. His acting skills are close to non-existent but nobody notices because a lot of his films involve some of the finest moving sex shows on the planet.

The cars in a Statham film are paramount to its success, and the Shelby Mustang GT500 in Death Race certainly delivered its promise. With more modifications than a car from Need for Speed: Underground, the Mustang was as menacing as Statham himself. If you’ve got a spare 1hr and half, little expectation for acting and a love for cars, Death Race is the film for you.

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